Course Descriptions

Legal Studies (LGS)  ♦  Paralegal (LAS)  ♦  Politcial Science (POL)  ♦  Political Science (POL) - MPA Classes


Legal Studies - LGS

LGS 300: Introduction to Legal Studies (3) A.
Prerequisite: ENG 102, ENG 105, or HON 102. Examination of foundations and liberal arts perspectives of legal studies. Topics include comparative and  historical introduction to forms, institutions, processes, and systems of law along with research methods for understanding questions of law and justice.

LGS 305: Special Topics: _________ (3) A.
Prerequisite: LGS 300. Exploration of topics not covered in the existing LGS curriculum. May be taken for a maximum of six hours provided that subject matter is different each time.

LGS 306: Animals and the Law (3) A.
Formerly LAS 306. The study of topics that relate to the status of animals under the law. The course focuses upon cases, legislation, and cultural values toward animals world-wide. Credit will  not be awarded to students who have credit for LAS 306.

LGS 349: Applied Learning for Legal Studies (1-8) A.
Prerequisite: LGS 300. Work or volunteer in an area related to Legal Studies. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for each semester hour credit.  No more than 3 hours may count toward LGS program.

LGS 400: Legal Studies Senior Seminar (3) A.
Prerequisite: LGS 300 and at least six hours of LGS electives. Conduct research in an area related to Legal Studies, write a research paper, and present an  oral presentation on research conducted. No more than 3 hours may count toward LGS program.


Political Science (POL)

POL 100: Principles of Politics and Government (3) I, II.
An introductory social science course focusing on the political and governmental aspects of societies. Does not count toward political science major requirements. Credit will not be awarded for both POL  100 and 100S. Gen. Ed. VB, VC, or VII (SBS). [SB].

POL 100S: Principles of Politics and Government (3) I, II.
An introductory social science course focusing on the political and governmental aspects of societies, enhanced with a service-learning component. Does not count toward the political science major  requirements. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 100 and 100S. Gen. Ed. VB, VC, or VII (SBS). [SB].

POL 101: Introduction to American Government (3) I, II.
Principles, functions, and basic political institutions of the American system of government at the national level. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 101 and POL 101S. Gen. Ed. VB, VC, or VII (SBS). [SB] E-5A, E-5B.

POL 101S: Introduction to American Government: Service Learning (3) A.
Principles, functions, and basic political institutions of the American system of government at the national level enhanced with a service-learning component. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 101  and 101S. Gen. Ed. VB, VC, or VII (SBS).

POL 201: Short Topics in Political Science (1‑3) A.
A maximum of three short topics offered during any semester. The student may take any or all topics. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours when topics vary. For those qualified high school students enrolled in the topic “A Kentucky Locality” the grade of “IP” may be given.

POL 212: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3) I, II.
A study of the purpose, concepts, and methods used in the cross-national study of politics and government. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for both POL 210 and 211. Gen. Ed. VB or VC or VII (SBS). [SB].  E-5A or E-5B.

POL 220: Introduction to International Relations (3) I, II.
The study of the political interactions of countries and the relationship of politics to economics, the environment, technology, culture and society on a global level. Gen. Ed. VB, VC, or VII (SBS). [SB].

POL 250: Introduction to Political Philosophy (3) I, II
Examination of Western political theory from the ancient Greeks to the contemporary era with a focus on selected philosophers. Gen. Ed. Elements 3B and 5B.

POL 280: Research and Writing in Political Science (3) A. 
Prerequisite: majors, minors, or departmental approval. Practical application of techniques and methods used in collection, analysis, and written presentation of political data. No more than 6 hours of  POL courses numbered 300 or above may be taken prior to completing POL 280.

POL 300: Contemporary Political Problems: ______ (3) I, II.
Application of the skills of citizenship to problems of contemporary politics. Designed to increase the students’ political awareness and ability to function politically in contemporary society. May be  retaken to a maximum of nine hours provided the topic differs each time.

POL 301: Citizens’ Assembly (CACTUS) (3) A.
Citizens’ Assembly for Critical Thinking about the United States (CACTUS), an exercise in deliberative democracy. Students study, hold hearings, deliberate, discuss alternatives, and make a decision on a  topic of significance in American politics. Gen. Ed. E-5B.

POL 302: Science and the Liberal Arts (3) A.
Prerequisite: Gen. Ed. Block I. Contemporary scientific and technological issues will be examined through the application of political science and other social science disciplines. Gen. Ed. VII (SBS).

POL 310: Latin American Governments (3) A.
A study of the political institutions and issues facing the people and governments of Latin America.

POL 312: Politics in China (3) A.
Analysis of political development, organizational structure, and operation of Chinese political systems with particular emphasis on Chinese Communism, foreign policies, and contemporary problems in  China.

POL 313: Politics of Japan (3) A.
Examination of Japan’s political development, government institutions, public policies and foreign relations.

POL 315: European Politics (3) A.
Examination of the politics and public policies of the European Union and selected European countries.

POL 316: Politics in Russia (3) A.
Nature and development of Russia’s political system since the end of the USSR and fall of communism; impact of the Soviet era; development of political parties and civil society; superpresidentialism;  nationalism; federalism and ethnic politics.

POL 319: Canadian Politics (3) A.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 105 (B) or HON 102. Canada’s political system, including British, American, and French, First Nations and recent immigrant influences; governmental institutions, federalism, political parties and electoral systems; ethnic and linguistic politics; Canadian-U.S. relations. Gen. Ed. E-6.

POL 320: National Security Strategy (3) A.
Examines the theories and processes of national security strategy to understand the complexities and interrelationships of the strategic environment, within the constraints of the political environment  and scarce resources.

POL 321: American Foreign Policy (3) II.
Prerequisite: three hours of POL or instructor approval. Analysis of the internal processes and external factors which affect U.S. foreign policy, with emphasis on the post‑World War II period. Case studies  in decision‑making.

POL 325: International Security Affairs (3) I.
Analysis of major problems of national/international security, the role of military power and arms control in the nuclear era, with emphasis on military‑security policies of great powers.

POL 327: International Law and Organization (3) A.
Prerequisite: three hours of POL or instructor approval. Analysis of the development of the U.N.; functional and regional approaches to peace, security, economic cooperation, social welfare, and law in  international relations.

POL 331: Urban Politics (3) A.
Political processes of urban areas including comparisons of alternative structures of urban and other local government.

POL 332: Kentucky Government and Politics (3) I, II.
An overview of the Kentucky political system: major institutions, processes and political leaders, with emphasis on recent events and developments. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 332 and POL  497B.

POL 333: American State and Local Government (3) A.
Study of the institutions and processes of government of the fifty states and of cities and counties.

POL 340: American Politics: Parties, Public Opinion, and Pressure Groups (3) A.
Informal political institutions of American government; functions, organization, financing of political parties, public opinion, and pressure groups. Their relationship to democracy.

POL 341: The Legislative Process: Congress and State Legislatures (3) A.
A systematic examination of the decision‑making process in Congress and state legislature.

POL 342: The American Chief Executive: President and Governor (3) A.
An examination of the power and functions of the offices of the President and governor. Recent developments affecting the American President will be emphasized.

POL 345: Minority Group Politics (3) A.
Cross listed as AFA 345. Examination and comparison of various theories, strategies, forms of participation, leadership styles, and concepts (e.g., Black Power) of minority group politics. Credit will not be  awarded for both POL 345 and AFA 345. Gen. Ed. VIII.

POL 347: Politics and Religion in the U.S. (3) A.
Interaction of government, politics, and religion in the U.S.: role of Supreme Court and Constitution in defining church‑state separation and religious freedom; religious organizations as pressure groups;  religion in electoral politics and foreign policy-making; religion and public schools.

POL 349: Applied Learning in Political Science (1‑8) A.
Work in placements related to academic studies. One to eight hours credit per semester or summer. Total hours: eight, associate; sixteen, baccalaureate. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for  ach semester hour credit. No more than six hours may count toward this major. No more than three hours may count toward this minor.

POL 349 A-N: Cooperative Study: Political Science (1‑8) A.
Work in placements related to academic studies. One to eight hours credit per semester or summer. Total hours: eight, associate; sixteen, baccalaureate. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for  each semester hour credit. No more than six hours may count toward this major. No more than three hours may count toward this minor.

POL 357: American Political Thought (3) A.
Study of the political philosophy and values that have shaped the American political system. Emphasis given to problems in democratic theory and to competing ideologies within the American political system.

POL 360: Judicial Process (3) A.
Study of legal and judicial systems in the United States and their role in the American political process.

POL 370: Introduction to Public Administration (3) A.
Survey of organization, authority, decision‑making, intra-organization communications, and application of principles of the American bureaucracy by case studies.

POL 371: Administration of Social Services and Agencies (3) A.
Examination of the political and administrative problems in public and not-for-profit agencies and a survey of management tools available to those responsible for the delivery of social services.

POL 373: Politics of Development in Appalachia (3) A.
Cross listed as APP 373. This course examines community and economic development in the Appalachian region with special emphasis on Kentucky. Focus will be on the political, economic and social  aspects affecting development. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 373 and APP 373.

POL 374: Introduction to Public Policy (3) A.
Introduction to the role of federal, state, and local governments in the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of public policies. Examples of policy decisions which might be covered include energy, housing, environmental quality, and social services.

POL 376: Public Human Resources (3) A. 
Policies and practices for human resources management in public services. Civil Service systems and reforms, diversity and affirmative action, managing, compensating, and motivating employees.

POL 377: Public Budgeting (3) A.
The political consideration of budget formulation, budget strategy, and budget execution. An analysis of the role of taxes, spending, program evaluation, and planning in the budgeting process at the  federal, state, and local levels.

POL 400W: Capstone Course in Political Science (3) I, II.
Prerequisites: POL 101, POL 212, POL 220, and POL 250; ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. Culminating, integrative course for political science majors. Requires advanced analysis integrating subfields  of the discipline. Students will complete a major paper assignment, writing in stages with instructor feedback and revisions.

POL 405: Special Topics in Political Science (3) A.
Exploration of a particular topic; theorist, institution, process, policy, writings, or their combinations. Prerequisites set by the department. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours provided subject  matter is different each time.

POL 410: Studies in Comparative Government and Politics (3) A.
Prerequisite: three hours of POL or departmental approval. Study of selected country, region, or a cross‑national study of a political institution (e.g. Executives, Political Parties, Legislatures). May be retaken  to a maximum of nine hours provided the subject matter differs each time.

POL 415: Terrorism and Political Violence (3) A.
Examines terrorism and political violence as causes and consequences of cultural, social and political change.

POL 421: The U.S. and Latin America (3) A.
Examines U.S. foreign policy in Latin America and the Caribbean; Latin American foreign policies; key hemispheric issues such as the war on drugs, immigration, foreign aid, and trade.

POL 440: Voting Behavior (3) A.
Survey of recent literature in the field of voting behavior in the U.S. Topics include public opinion, polling, participation, and campaign behavior. Attention paid to methodologies and techniques.

POL 445: Queer Theory and Politics (3) A.
Cross listed as WGS 445. Prerequisite: POL 100 or 101. The study of political issues, processes, and theories surrounding sexual minority Americans. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 445 and WGS  445.

POL 446: The Politics of Sex (3) A.
Cross listed as WGS 446. The effect of sex on social and political institutions, public policies, and court rulings. Issues may include pornography, sexual and gender discrimination, domestic violence, reproductive rights and gay rights. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 446 and WGS 446. Gen. Ed. VIII.

POL 451: Principles and Politics of Human Rights (3) A.
Cross listed as WGS 451. Examines politics of human rights in theory and in practice. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 451 and WGS 451.

POL 460: Law and Society (3) A.
Sources, nature, function, and limits of law as an instrument of social and political control and direction. Examples taken from property, torts, contracts, criminal law, and selected areas of public policy.

POL 463: Constitutional Politics (3) A.
An examination of constitutional problems in American government. Emphasis is given to cases in their legal and political context.

POL 464: Law and Politics of Civil Liberties (3) A.
An examination of historic and contemporary problems of civil liberties. Emphasis is given to cases in their legal and political context.

POL 466A: Mock Trial (2) I.
Prerequisite: departmental approval. Preparation of Mock Trial Competitions. Students will develop cases for presentation including preparing opening an closing arguments, introducing testimonial,  physical and demonstrative evidence, and conducting direct and cross examination of witnesses. May be retaken to a maximum of 8 hours, only 2 of which may be counted toward the political science  major and only 1 may be counted toward the political science minor.

POL 466B: Mock Trial (2) II.
Prerequisite: POL 466A and departmental approval. Preparation of Mock Trial Competitions. Students will develop cases for presentation including opening and closing arguments, introducing testimonial,  physical, and demonstrative evidence, and conducting direct and cross examination of witnesses. May be retaken to a maximum of 8 hours, only 4 of which may be counted toward the political science  major and only 2 may be counted toward the political science minor.

POL 490: Independent Work in Political Science (1‑3) A.
Individual research and/or reading on a problem or area in political science. Regular reports and final research paper required. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours. Students must have the  independent study proposal form approved by faculty supervisor and departmental chair prior to enrollment.

POL 495: Practicum in Political Science (1‑3) A.
Supervised field study program. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours, provided subject matter differs each time. Student must have the independent  study proposal form approved by faculty supervisor and departmental chair prior to enrollment.

POL 495A: Practicum in American Political Process (1‑3) A.

POL 495B: Practicum in Comparative Politics and International Relations (1‑3) A.

POL 496A: Washington Internship (6‑12) A.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing with 2.5 GPA. Supervised internship with government or private agencies in Washington, D.C. Open by application to those students who fulfill the prerequisite.

POL 496B: Washington Seminar (3) A.
Corequisite: POL 496A. Seminar on selected topics in national government.

POL 496C: Washington Forum (3) A.
Corequisite: POL 496A and POL 496B. Seminar on selected topics in national government.

POL 497: Kentucky Administrative Intern Program (18) A.
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.6 or better (on a 4.0 scale). Enrollment is by invitation only and limited to a maximum of 18 hours.

POL 497A: Internship in State Government (3‑9) A.
Each intern’s performance in his or her job is evaluated by the agency supervisor in consultation with the intern’s campus coordinator or the student’s advisor in the department granting credit for the  internship. May be retaken to a maximum of nine hours.

POL 497B: Selected Topics in Administration of Kentucky State Government (3‑12) A.
Seminar on various topics on the administration of Kentucky state government which support and constitute an essential part of the Kentucky Administrative Intern Program. May be retaken to a maximum  of 12 hours provided the topics vary. Credit will not be awarded for both POL 497B and POL 332.

POL 498: Kentucky Legislative Internship Program (0) A.
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing with a cumulative GPA of 2.8 or better (on a 4.0 scale) and a definite interest in the legislative process in the Commonwealth. Enrollment is by invitation only and  limited to a maximum of 15 hours by registering for POL 408A and 408B.

POL 498A: Legislative Internship (3‑9) A.
Each intern’s performance in his or her legislative assignment will be evaluated by the immediate supervisor in consultation with the campus coordinator. May be retaken to a maximum of nine hours.

POL 498B: Selected Topics in Kentucky Legislative Process (3‑9) A.
Seminar on various topics on the legislative process in the Commonwealth which support and constitute an essential part of the Kentucky Legislative Internship Program. May be retaken to a maximum of  nine hours.

POL 498C: Legislative Forum (3) A.
Corequisite: POL 498A and POL 498B. Seminar on selected topics in state government.

POL 499: Canadian Parliamentary Internship (5) A.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing with 2.5 GPA. Supervised internship in the office of a Member of the Canadian Parliament. Final selection for enrollment determined by program. Apply by December 1 for internship in May through June. May be repeated for a maximum of ten hours credit.

POL 517: Politics and Social Change (3) A.
Comparative study of politics in present and past societies to consider the relationship between politics, political change and the broader social change. Emphasis on political phenomena especially suited  to comparative study.

POL 521: Contemporary International Relations (3) A.
Systematic analysis of major contemporary theories and approaches to the study of international politics and foreign policy.

POL 525: Problems in International Relations (3) A.
Explores major problems in international relations. Covers various areas of the world with reference to significant factors and problems of the people.

POL 533: Seminar In State and Local Politics (3) A.
A topical analysis of the institutions, policies, and administration of American state and local government. May be retaken to a total of six hours credit, provided subject matter differs each time.

POL 541: Politics and Education (3) A.
An examination of the way political decisions and policies are made in the field of education. Special attention is given to educational decision makers and political power at the local level.

POL 551: Classical Political Theory (3) A.
Cross-listed as PHI 551. Examination of Western political thought from Plato to Aquinas. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 551, PHI 551W, or POL 551W.

POL 551W: Classical Political Theory (3) A.
Cross-listed as PHI 551W. Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. Examination of Western political thought from Plato to Aquinas. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI  551, PHI 551W, or POL 551.

POL 552: Modern Political Theory (3) A.
Cross-listed as PHI 552. Examination of Western political theory from the Renaissance to the mid-twentieth century. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 552, PHI 552W or POL  552W.

POL 552W: Modern Political Theory (3) A.
Cross-listed as PHI 552W. Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 105 (B) or HON 102. Examination of Western political theory from the Renaiisance to the mid-twentieth century. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 552, PHI 552W, or POL 552.

POL 553: Contemporary Political Theory (3) A.
Cross-listed as PHI 553. Examination of Western political thought from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 553, PHI 553W or POL 553W.

POL 553W: Contemporary Political Theory (3) A.
Cross-listed as PHI 553W. Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102. Examination of Western political thought from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PHI 553, PHI 553W or POL 553.

POL 565: Administrative Law (3) A.
Nature of the powers vested in administrative agencies; the problems of administrative procedure; and the methods and extent of judicial control over administrative action.